Friday, July 6, 2018

Even More Daylilies

Time for another bouquet of daylilies! 

As mentioned in previous entries, these are all "old" photos from earlier in the summer.  There are a few daylilies blooming here and there around the garden, and some have been reblooming, but our daylily season has definitely peaked.  May and June are our best daylily months, I think. 

The best thing about taking so many photos is that I can reminisce about those weeks of peak bloom any time of year.  I actually did spend some happy hours looking through my old daylily photos, last winter.  (Ah, winter, when you've forgotten exactly how hot and humid July can be and are still able to look at garden photos from previous years and promise yourself that you'll actually stay on top of the weeding, next summer!)

- - - - - - -

I'm starting with two of our new, named (registered) varieties-- new to the garden, blooming here for the first time. 

'Midnight Magic'. 
This is one of those dark, dramatic daylilies that I just love.  This variety is not reblooming, but it did pretty well for us, considering this was its first year.  I think that of the dark varieties, this was the best-performing of our new, named daylilies.  The others were pretty, but didn't have nearly as many flowers.  Notice the purple-splotched buds. 

'Midnight Magic' Daylily

'Miss Amelia'. 
Now, this one does rebloom, and I think it's been a very good bloomer (and rebloomer) for us, so far.  The very pale yellow is great, too.  I can't think of a color this flower wouldn't complement. 

'Miss Amelia' Daylily

Now, on to the No-Names (or no names that I know). ;o)  Aw, don't worry, mystery flowers, we love you just as much!  To be honest, my favorites (at the moment) are all no-names. 

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

There was some type of skipper butterfly on this daylily.  It must've been comfortable, because it didn't budge, despite the intrusion of the camera's spying lens. 

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

There are still plenty of photos to sort through and edit, so there are more to come!

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything Else

Time for a break from the daylilies.  Here are (months-old) photos of "everything else" (more or less) in the flower garden.

Louisiana iris.
'Black Gamecock'.

Louisiana Iris

Louisiana Iris

'Jeri'.

Louisiana Iris

'Grandpa Ott' morning glory seedlings.

Morning Glory Seedlings

Bees on salvia. 
The first photo is bog sage.  All the others are 'Blue Bedder' sage.  See how much more of a "true blue" the bog sage is?  The colors are fairly accurate in these photos, I think.  'Blue Bedder' is pretty, but it's not really blue; it's a nice bluish purple.  Bog sage, on the other hand, is actually blue.

Bee on Bog Sage

Bee and 'Blue Bedder' Salvia

Bee and 'Blue Bedder' Salvia

Bee and 'Blue Bedder' Salvia

Bee and 'Blue Bedder' Salvia

Tropical milkweed.

Tropical Milkweed

Cleome foliage.
It looks suspiciously similar to a certain other plant that is illegal to grow, but when it blooms, the airy pink flowers are probably a tip-off that it's something different.  I like cleome for its old-fashioned charm.  It reminds me of my grandmother's garden.

Cleome Foliage

The Oval Bed.

The Oval Bed

Blanket flower (with Mexican bush sage in the back).

Blanket Flower

...and here with 'Blue Bedder' salvia.

Blanket Flower and Sage

Blanket Flower

Blanket Flower


Blanket Flower

'Russian Red' canna.
It's grown taller this year than last.  Seems to be doing well-- the most successful of the cannas I've tried growing, and it's not getting any special treatment.  It's not even in particularly good soil for canna lilies-- just the red sandy soil of our septic pad.  A good, hardy plant with tropical-style leaves.

'Russian Red' Canna

Summer flowers.

Summer Flowers

Volunteer sunflower.
Growing from seed dropped from the bird feeder over the winter.

Sunflower Bud

Yellow canna.
The dwarf canna planted at the corner of the garage are currently in second place, in the Best Canna contest.  The foliage is shorter, of course, and in my opinion somewhat dull compared to 'Russian Red', but it does have tropical appeal.

Yellow Canna Bloom

Our "too-red" rose is still putting out new too-red flowers.

"Too-Red Rose"

Viburnum.

Viburnum

Gardenia.  ('Double Mint'?)

Gardenia

Lantana.
This is one tough plant.  I don't think it's cold-hardy much further north than this, but around here, it dies back the ground in winter and returns every spring.  The flowers are intensely colorful, ranging from yellow through melon-orange to eye-searing hot pink.  It attracts butterflies and doesn't seem to mind heat, humidity, or even drought.

This one is growing out of the fenced yard, in front of the garage (because I was afraid our dogs might eat the berries, which are poisonous).  Plants in that area are on their own, so they have to be tough to survive, and the lantana is perfectly happy there.  Another plus-- it's deer resistant.

Lantana

Lantana

Lantana

Lantana

Lantana

Lantana


'Lady Margaret' passionflower vine.

There were no flowers when I took this, but they've been blooming for a while, now.  The Gulf fritillaries came earlier this summer than last (when they were unusually late, for some reason).  There are caterpillars munching down even as I type.  Last week, I saw one of them had made its way to our main gate and was in the process of forming its chrysalis.  Then this morning I saw that another one on the same gate (a little further ahead in the race) had just emerged and was waiting for its wings to dry/harden/whatever it is that butterfly wings do just after they emerge from the chrysalis.

A whole life cycle unfolding (very visibly) in your own backyard.  Passionflower vine would be a great plant for anyone with kids or grandkids!

'Lady Margaret' Passionflower Vine

'Joseph's Coat' rose.

'Joseph's Coat' Rose

Coreopsis.
These got started from a pass-along clump from Granny L.'s garden.  It makes me happy to see them still popping up every year, meandering their way here and there, occasionally aided by transplanting.  They're annuals, but there always seems to be at least a few that manage to reseed themselves, even through the pine straw mulch.

Coreopsis

Coreopsis

Coreopsis

Hardy gladiolus.
I haven't been thrilled with the return-rate of the so-called hardy gladiolus I planted the autumn before last.  They did well last year, but most didn't come back up!  I'm not sure what went wrong.  We did have some cold weather, but I thought they would've survived that.  I'm unlikely to plant more of them, given these disappointing results-- but never say never...

There were two kinds that have returned.  One is an unknown red (no photos, this time).  The other is 'Atom', which seems to have come back pretty vigorously, even multiplying into the beginnings of small clumps (like a good little gladiolus).  I can recommend 'Atom'!

'Atom' Gladiolus

'Atom' Gladiolus

'Atom' Gladiolus

Hybrid gladiolus.
I think I might try another bag of hybrid glad corms, next year... They can be a bit floppy, but I enjoy the ones that have survived from the first batch we planted so long ago.  Most of them have petered out, but a few have been happy enough to multiply, over the years.

The fact that apparently we're not supposed to like them ("funeral flowers", too gaudy, etc.) appeals to my healthy streak of contrariness.  I also plant orange, pink, and red all together, just for the heck of it. ;oP

Gladiolus

Curcuma elata (giant plume ginger).
When I first started gardening, I never would've thought I'd ever come to like tropical-looking plants-- maybe as a result of not liking our tropical-feeling summers!  But when you live in a semi-tropical climate, you're really better off just going with the flow.  Give in.  Bend the knee (and plant some ginger lilies in your garden).  They are beautiful.

Curcuma Elata Bloom

Bog sage.

Bog Sage

Still months behind; still hundreds of photos to process and post!